Education

Teaching Animation or Graphic

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

ROV Explainer Graphic Poster

Learn about the features of Remotely Operated Vehicles which help the Corps of Exploration understand our ocean world. 

Learn more about the ROVs and different technologies used in the Nautilus Exploration Program here

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Multibeam Cutaway Teaching Graphic

Nautilus is equipped with an acoustic echosounder that simultaneously collects bathymetric, seafloor backscatter, and water column backscatter data to enable identification of areas or features of interest and the production of high-quality seafloor maps at depths to 7,000 meters (23,000 feet).

Whether focused on a canyon, seamount, or shipwreck, creating a map allows us to identify potential targets, cutting down exploration time and boosting our mission efficiency.

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Telepresence Teaching Graphic

E/V Nautilus is equipped with a high-bandwidth satellite communication system that can transmit data to an unlimited number of viewers and scientists ashore who remotely stand watch with us.

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Compressed Styrofoam Cups Teaching Graphic

As we dive, the atmospheric pressure of the water gradually increases and applies force to ROVs Hercules and Argus. For every 10 meters (33 feet), that pressure increases by 14.5 pounds per square inch.  

Observing how a Styrofoam compresses on its way down to the seafloor is a unique way to see this pressure in action. At 1200 meters (3,900 feet), a cup will have shrunk by about half of its original size. The  effect is a miniature cup!

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Ocean Drifters Teaching Animation

Ocean drifters measure currents and other parameters, such as temperature and salinity, to further deepen our understanding of the oceanic environment. The main difference between the two major types of ocean drifters are their placement in the water column. As their name suggests, surface drifters remain in the top one meter (three feet) of the water column whereas deepwater drifters are suspended to a certain depth below the water surface to track subsurface currents. 

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Deep Sea Pressure Teaching Animation

As we dive, the atmospheric pressure of the water gradually increases and applies force on ROVs Hercules and Argus. For every 10 meters (33 feet), that pressure increases by 14.5 pounds per square inch.  

Imagine holding 15 jumbo jets at once! That's about the pressure pushing in on our ROVs at the deepest depths of Nautilus exploration. These forces and their scientific implications are important to consider when exploring never-before-seen oceanic territory. 

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Undersea Navigation Teaching Animation

E/V Nautilus and ROV Hercules are each equipped with transponders to signal or ping to each other to provide a signal or range bearing. This method of "talking" to each other is used to determine and keep track of the location of the ROV.

Clips used in public presentations should be credited “Courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust/ Nautilus Live."

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Seafloor Mapping Teaching Animation

When exploring little-known regions of the ocean, we often need to create our own maps to plan efficient and safe operations. Nautilus is equipped with an acoustic echosounder that simultaneously collects bathymetric, seafloor backscatter, and water column backscatter data to enable identification of areas or features of interest and the production of high-quality seafloor maps at depths to 7,000 meters (23,000 feet).

Teaching Animation or Graphic:

Dual Body ROV System Teaching Animation

ROVs Hercules and Argus work together to explore the ocean floor. Hercules is equipped with high-definition cameras and lights to provide eyes on the seafloor and is connected to Argus by a tether. This tether sends vital information and video streams through a cable to the control van located aboard E/V Nautilus

The two-body ROV system and dynamic positioning system ensures that vehicles in the water are stable and secure during dive operations.